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Monday, September 4, 2017

POTAJE WITH 15TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR ONION POTTAGE

Fish Glop: Finale
Photo by: Lord-Williams
OCat pottatge, Cat potatge, Fr potage, Eng pottage, thick soup or stew, a mixture of various eatable substances. The word pottage comes from French meaning something prepared in the pot as opposed to food roasted or baked
The Old Testament, Genesis (25:21-34), indicates what one’s birthright is worth. Esau sold his (containing a double portion of his father’s inheritance) to Jacob, his younger twin brother, for a "mess of (lentil) pottage".

 Greeks introduced purees to Spain by the 8th C BC and the Romans furthered this dish to the point that thick soups were current in medieval Spain. During Lent, spinach with codfish pottage was frequently consumed in Spain. England followed this course through its own roots of pottages and soppes. [Anón/Grewe. 1982:61-62:ftn 3; Dialecto. 1947:298; Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:68 and ES: Gutiérrez. Jun 1, 98]

Numerous recipes for medieval pottages are provided by the Medieval Spanish Chef at this site.

ONION POTTAGE ADAPTED FROM NOLA’S xxvii-2 POTAJE QUE SE DICE PORRIOL

Ingredients

A Lovely Pottage with lots of tidbits
Photo by: Lord-Williams 
2 onions
salt to taste
100 gr chunks of bacon or sweet oil
1 c white wine
¼ c vinegar
½ tsp white pepper
chopped or whole partridges or another bird

Preparation

Peel and chop onions on a cutting board with a knife. While chopping, pour cold salted water over them several times, squeezing out the viscosidad each time. 

Then put them in a pot cover them with water.  Add bacon or oil. Bring to a boil. Add wine and vinegar. Bring to a boil and reduce heat. Gently boil five minutes or until the onions are translucent. Add pepper and salt to taste.

Taste the pottage. If too strong add more water and if necessary more salt. Then add partridges or an other bird and serve.

NOLA’S xxvii-2 POTAJE QUE SE DICE PORRIOL




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