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Monday, January 30, 2017

PAVO WITH A POTTAGE OF PARTRIDGE SPICES IN ALMOND MILK

Peacock
Photo from: SW
pavo real, pavon, OCast, pauo, pauon, OCat pagó, paguó, pahón, Cat pagó, paó-reial, L. Pavo cristatus, Eng. peacock. Note the peacock in Spanish is called pavo or pavo real, which today is translated as “turkey” but in the Middle Ages there were none in Europe. The peacock is a native of India. Only the male tail feathers have eyespots.

Classical physicians customarily recommended that the throat of the fowl be slit and then hung with the feathers still on for a few hours before roasting. Sent Soví instructs that it should be killed and hung the night before it is to be cooked. This procedure was recommended for human digestion to be as rapid as possible for they thought this was like yeast added to bread because it was thought that it facilitated digestion.

Not only were peacocks well thought of in medieval times but after roasting the birds whole, their coats were put back on for a spectacular parade through the dining hall with a mantilla over the tail and a gold cloth baring the king’s coat of arms around the neck. They were normally served as a “sublety” or “entremet.” Removing the coat whole, prior to cooking, was a culinary art. For knights, the peacock was the symbol of power, see voto del pavo real.

Peacock
Photo from: Christopher Kett
Villena explains that the method for carving the peacock is basic for large birds. First the neck and tail are removed. Then the threads and the barding of streaky bacon (see albardar) are discarded. The wings are cut off the body and then the legs. The meat is removed from the bones. The breast is sliced lengthwise and then the, sternum, neck and pelvis are cut in half. Then the coccyx is sliced.

The king was served the first wing. Other parts of the bird were served to those at the high table. Peacock was not given to classes below aristocrats.

Peacock was a showy bird but the meat is dry and that of the male is very strong. Often hens or other fowl were served in peacock coats until the American turkey came to Europe, which replaced the consumption of peacock.

Avenzoar warned  that peacocks have the same properties as cranes (grullas), but more pronounced. He stated that they are coarser and have a drier nature than pigeons (palomas), although their other properties are very similar. He recommended peacock meat for those suffering from prostration and hemophilia, but thought them harmful for people of a warm nature. He claimed that they are digested with difficulty, especially during the summer season.  

[Alonso Luengo. 1994:39:43; Anón/Grewe. 1982:I:62-63:ftn 2:XXXIIII:86:XXXXV:89 etc;
Benavides-Barajas. Nueva-Clásica. 1995:198; Ency Brit.1998:9:Otter:223:2b; Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:138;189; Ibn Zuhr/García Sánchez. 1992:52; Anón/Grewe. 1982:I:62-63:II:64:III:65 etc; Lladonosa. 1984:130:158; Nola/Iranzo. 1982:170; Ruíz/Brey.1965:1116a: 179; Sas. 1976:466; and Villena/Calero. 2002:22b:24b-26a] 

ADAPTED FROM LLADONOSA’S  VERSION OF SENT SOVÍ RECIPE #XXXXIIII, PEACOCK SPICES IN ALMOND MILK/QUI PARLA CON SE DEY PER SALSA DE PAGUÓ AB LET DE MELLES, pp 86-89

Ingredients

Spices for Peacocks
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 shank of lamb
tripe from 1 lamb
100 gr chunks of bacon
1 ¼ c almonds
1 qt broth
1 chicken entails and heart
2 hearts of a rabbit
2 tbsp lard
2 sliced onions
juice from one lemon or 1 orange or 1 pomegranate
½ c honey
1 tsp spices from salsa de pago[1]
1 tbsp ginger[2]
1 tsp cinnamon[2]
1 tsp saffron[2]
1 lb meat from chicken wings [3]

Preparation

Wash well a shank and tripe of a lamb. Scald them with a junk of bacon. With this broth make almond milk using raw, peeled almonds well chopped and broth. Let sit 6 hours and strain.

Cut chicken entrails and hearts with the rabbit hearts. Gently fry in lard or the grease from the bacon. Gently fry them over low heat to prevent the grease from burning. Remove from pan leaving the grease.

Scald the onions and slice them. Gently fry them in the grease from the entails and hearts.  Then add the entails and hearts. Chop all this in a food processor making a thin paste*.

A meal without the peacock!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Add lemon or orange juice or bitter pomegranates with a little honey. (These ingredients should be used moderately at the discretion of the cook.) Add the spices used in “salsa de pago”. Add ginger, cinnamon and saffron if a stronger mixture is desired.  

Pour this into a pot and add almond milk. Cook until thick. When cooked, the mixture should have a sweet and sour flavor well accented by the spices. The color of the sauce should be between cinnamon and saffron.

According to the recipe, grease from roasting pheasants or chicken can be added: this should be added with caution as it can become excessively greasy.

*Also finely chopped chicken livers can be added after straining them. Well chopped meat from chicken and partridge wings can be added as well. It appears to be better to use the meat from wings mashed in a mortar and strained. This sauce should be thick and it is best to serve it in small quantities.


[1] See blog titled escudilla published April 21, 2014 for Sent Soví’s recipe and the blog titled manera, published February 22, 2016, for Nola’s recipe.
[2] optional.
[2] ground chicken was used.

 LLADONOSA’S  VERSION OF SENT SOVÍ RECIPE #XXXXIIII


SENT SOVÍ 

SENT SOVÍ  footnotes





Friday, January 27, 2017

PATERNOSTER MARKING TIME BY RECITING THE LORD'S PRAYER

Measuring Cooking Time
Photo by: Lord-Williams
OCast Pater nofter, Paternoftre, Pater noster, Eng The Lord’s Prayer, a measurement in cooking time. See Ave María. [Nola. 1989:xxii-1:xliiii-2:xliiii-3; and Nola/Pérez. 1994:205]


For blogs containing recipes using the Lord’s Prayer to measure time see almodrote published August 23, 2011; almuestra published September 1, 2011; and cobertor published Febuary 27, 2013.

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

PATA NEGRA WITH HAM AND CHEESE TAPAS

A Lovely Specimen of a "Black Hoof"
Photo by: Lord-Williams
(“black hoof”), a pig raised in forests with a diet of only acorns from holm and cork oaks. The name comes from the color of his hooves after a day of grubbing for acorns. The finest quality of Serrano ham comes from this type of pig. See alcornoque, encina, montanera and roble. [Pers. Memories. Slaughters Mostoles. 2000:2001:2003; and Serradilla. 1993:145]


THE MEDIEVAL SPANISH CHEF’S RECIPE FOR HAM AND CHEESE TAPAS

Ingredients

2 slices of flatbread (pita is fine)
50 gr cheese
25 gr. serrano ham


Garnish

Oregano leaves

Serrano Ham, The Key to Gourmet Eating
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Preparation

Cut flat bread into diamonds. Toast 2 minutes in toaster. Remove.

Remove rinds from cheese thinly slice into diamond shapes. Place on top of the bread.


Shed ham and cover the cheese with this. Toast for one minute in the toaster. Remove and garnish with oregano leaves.

Monday, January 23, 2017

PATRAÑAS WITH AN HISTORIC FABA BEAN AND SAUSAGE RECIPE

Velazquez' painting
An Old Woman Cooking Eggs
Photo from: Luís Ribes Mateu
patrañas, L. pastoranĕa, Eng. acceptance of lies or fabulous legends especially intertwined with references to the salvation or the reincarnation and the resurrection of Christ.

Juan Ruíz uses the word with a double meaning to explain the custom in autumn during pig slaughtering time, at the end of the day the old women sat beside chestnuts roasting on the fire saying their prayers, accepting Christ’s salvation, spinning yarns about the past or simply gossiping. In the eerie shadows of the evening before the fire, their murmurs come to sound like bewitched, morbid notes as the voices Macbeth’s witches.
 
Diego Velazquez painted her cooking eggs, which represent the resurrection of Christ as eggs were served when celebrating Easter but prohibited during Lent. Indeed the old woman has a place in all periods of Spanish history. 

[ES: RAE. 2001; Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:144; and Ruíz/Brey. 1965:198:1273d]

THE MEDIEVAL SPANISH CHEF’ RECIPE FOR FABA BEAMS WITH SAUSAGE, A TYPICAL WINTER DISH EATEN ESPECIALLY DURING THE SLAUGHTER OF PIGS

Ingredients

A Hardy Dish on a Cold Wintr Day
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 c dried fava beans
1 tsp soda
2 tbsp olive oil
1 sm onion
2 tbsp flour
1 c white wine
1 qt broth
salt to taste
½ tsp white pepper
1 blood pudding sausage link
1 chorizo link
2 white sausage links


Preparation

Soak fava beans in water with soda overnight. Rinse well and put in pot. Cover with water, bring to a boil, low heat and simmer 15-20 minutes until the beans a tender.

Chop onion. Heat olive oil in a frying pan. Add onion and fry until translucent. Remove the onion. Slice chorizo and add. Fry a little.

Drain fava beans, saving the broth in a pot.

Cook broth. Add wine. Let thicken. Add beans.  Let cook until thick.

Season with salt and pepper.





Friday, January 20, 2017

PASTEL EN BOTE, NOLA'S YUMMY LAMB PIE FILLING, WITHOUT THE CRUST

Browning Ground Lamb
Photo by: Lord-Williams
pot filling. This is a meat-pie filling, which is cooked in a pot, rather than baked in a crust. It has no crust. [Nola. 1989:xlviii-4]

A POT OF MEAT PIE FILING ADAPTED FROM NOLA’S xlviii-4 PASTEL EN BOTE

Ingredients

1 lb meat from a leg of lamb
lamb fat
1 c meat broth[1]

½ tsp saffron
½ tsp pepper
½ tsp ground cloves
½ c  breadcrumbs
1 c  grated cheese

Preparation

Lamb and Cheese
An Ideal Combination
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Remove the fat from a leg of lamb.

Cut meat off the leg of lamb. Grind it.

Chop half the fat from the leg[2]
and grind it with the meat.

Melt the fat that has not been ground in a pot. When crisp, remove and discard. Add the meat combined with fat. Cook well, breaking it up and turning to cook all sides.

Add saffron mashed and dissolved in a little broth, white pepper, cloves and the rest of the broth. Cook a little. Add breadcrumbs. Mix well. Add grated cheese. Stir it into the mixture. Cook until melts. Remove from heat and serve.


[1] The Medieval Spanish Chef’s addition.
[2] ES: Nola/Brighid posted 2001 translates this as “bacon” but bacon is defined as “cured meat from the back or sides of a pig.” It seems saver to say that lamb fat is used in this case.


NOLA’S xlviii-4


 

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

PASCUA WITH DELICIOUS "BADLY COOKED" MILK PUDDING!

Heb. Pesach, Eng passover, the passing. In Spanish, it refers to Christmas (Las Pascuas de Navidad) , Easter (Pascua), Pentecost (Pascua de la Florida, Pascua de la Resurrección or La Pascua del Espíritu Santo), which takes place seven weeks after Easter Sunday, or the Grape Harvest Festival (Pascua de los al-Asir), which is celebrated between the saint’s day of St. Augustine, August 28th (see vendimia). It was an Arab outdoor celebration, dancing and music, zambras (popular songs) accompanied by lute, tambourine and Walladh, (popular dance, predecessor of the popular Andalusian dancing called OlÈs), castanets, guitars and percussion instruments to accompany Zegeles and Moaxajas (types of popular rhythmatic couplets). In all three religions there were festivities the first half of September celebrating the harvest or the moon but they could be anywhere from the saint's day of St. Augustine, August 28th to Michaelmas on the 28th of  September when there is a full moon. 

[Benavides-Barajas. Alhambra. 1999:55 and Castro. Alimentación. 1996:103:269:276 etc]

See blog titled "Leche mal cocida," published October 23, 2015, for a delicious variation of the same recipe.
  
 BADLY COOKED MILK ADAPTED FROM NOLA’S xxxi-4 LECHE MAL COCIDA[1]

Ingredients

"Badly Cooked" - Nothing, a splendid pudding!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 c almonds
1 slice of crustless bread
¼ c rosewater
1 qt chicken broth[2]
4 egg yolks

Garnish:


½ tsp cinnamon
1 tsp sugar
mint leaves (optional)

Preparation

Blanch almonds in boiling water. Remove skins and grind in a food grinder with a crustless slice of bread soaked in rosewater. Add broth and bend well. Strain through a cheese cloth into a pot. 

Bring to a boil. Remove from heat and add beaten egg yolks. Stir four times and pour the mixture until dessert bowls. Rosewater is always good in many dishes.

Garnish with a mixture of sugar and cinnamon.


[1] Recipes with eggs denoted celebrations especially following Lent when animals were procreating and it was prohibited to eat meat and animal products including milk and eggs. Easter was celebrated with egg dishes. In spite of the title, this recipe could have been used on Easter Sunday.
[2] It is assumed that broth is needed to make almond milk.

NOLA’S xxxi-4